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ART & CULTURE
abdelilah
Santa Cruz California USA
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17
comments.
Vulgarity as revolution: Lemsakh we tsalguit
01:43:30 PM Monday Nov 12, 2007


Sometimes I wonder if using vulgar words in songs can be a way of revolutionizing the cultural status quo bu shaking the foundations of fake morality. For instance, hajib's song "a7 a7 bechwiyya" can have that potential. I find it hilarious even if the image of women is still macho despite the fact that he is queer. We have 9ayllaw of 3awd lil and the traditional indirect songs of "ach jaa ydir fe 3 dellil" werrini wahchek yal ghaba or hdaa al 3awd hdaa. The le33abates of Asfi have that kind of "lemsakh" in their songs and one song of raiss bel3id. So do you think that lemsakh can become a movement?

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4:37 am    May 2, 2012

o message
17
7
the post that "dean" made is absolutely revolting and should be removed immediately by an admin.
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4:15 pm    January 27, 2009

Salem message
16
Moroccan Rap has gained a lot of respect since some private radio stations, HitRadio in particular, broadcast much of it over the last two years. Most of Moroccan Rap songs you hear these days are in PURE Moroccan Arabic, that is quite authentic spoken language as Rima said. But my point is that the thematic lyrics are often about current social and political issues. So far I heard no "Mse5" no "Tsalguit". If you wanna hear that, listen to 7ajib! :))
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3:50 pm    January 27, 2009

rima raider message
15
I think that, in your terms, "lemsakh we tsalguit" exist in most sha3bi songs not only in the lyrics of the emerging rap music in morocco. the problem lies in the way people percieve of both kinds of music; sha3bi songs are much more appreciated by the masses as they are considered to be part of popular culture; whereas the lyrics of rap music is thought to be shocking and unethical. for me, it's just a matter of culture, there are some sha3bi songs that contain much vulgarity(perhaps metigated by a play of words sometimes) than rap songs such as the songs:
''sedrek 3la sedri o ghir la ma ban fejri''
''ana lli 3titou sha3ri o howa lli 5ablou liya
ana lli 3titou sedri o howa lli jer7ou liya''
people can rehearse songs as such with the presence of their parents and they dont seem unethical.
whether it is a movement or not? here i'm talking about rap music (not lemsakh) whether we like it or not I think it is a movement since it has a considerable number of followers and a huge audience. personally i've heard some rap songs and i found them pretty much funny and choatic either in terms of the lyrics or the rhythm. anyway the only thing i like about rap music is that it uses pure moroccan arabic with its ''ugliness'' as some might say; i'm tired of hearing middle moroccan arabic in moroccan songs at least they are promoting the use of Moroccan Arabic.
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1:34 pm    January 25, 2009

minou message
14
I think it's more a way of expressing feelings rather than a movement, since we had theses songs for many decades if not for many centuries. Look at the rap music and how vulgar it is in USA, for most of the rapper it's the only way to express love is vulgarity, I dont want to compare cha3bi with usa rap, but I think vulgarity is oppressed feeling that artist express through their songs, by the way which song of raiss Bel3id is vulgar ?
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1:03 pm    December 5, 2007
9anfud
13
AL,
I'm sorry. I was indeed to much impulsive. His or other's gayness does not bother me in general. One of my best friends for more than a quater of a century is gay. After all, there are some people you just don't like, and I know that nobody is liked by everybody, including myself. And I agree with you, this space should be open to everybody including Hajib. :)
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2:43 am    December 5, 2007
AL
12
11
9anfud, your taste is your personal choice to be respected. From there to censor the mentioning of his name is a bit medieval for me. However, I would not mind discussing the issue under the new name "hadak lli maytsemmash". Hajib's gayness does not bother me at all.
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1:45 pm    December 3, 2007
9anfud
11
You mean this Gay Hajib. He is one of the ugliest persons I've ever seen and heard. No art, no class. Just kind of th lowest type bitch one can imagine or can't imagine... This place is not for his name to be mentionned...
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11:04 am    December 1, 2007

Adnane Ben. message
10
9
Ya weddi washmen "lehshouma trauma"? lehshouma is not a trauma, in my opinion it is positive character. Also, I don't even know this guy hajib.. I noticed that rappers are popping up in Morocco like petit pain, but honestly I didn't like most of what I heard and seen, especially someone called "big".. NO creativity at all! To make matters worse, these days I don't even find a decent petit pain au chocolat in Morocco!
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10:57 am    December 1, 2007

abdelilah message
9
Adnane, thank you for your questions. First, I would definitely keep the lyrics of hajib for the purposes of our topic here. As for the political countermovement seeds within it, I do not see it in those lyrics for the simple reason that hajib's description of women's sexuality is a classical male gaze .Knowing that he is gay, I would have considered it revolutionary to posit women's cunt in other lights. Sexual perversion can be a carrier of a revolutionary ideal like the writings of the marquis de Sade. Being uncomfortable when the song is heard is normal given the weight of lehshouma trauma to which we have been subjected for decades. Myself, I'd feel probably very shy around my family when hajib is doing his a7 a7 routine.
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3:59 pm    November 28, 2007

Adnane Ben. message
8
6
abdelilah ~ so how do you categorize the type of vulgarity in the post below? since you're the original poster, did you feel an inclination to censor the post? if you decide to keep it, probably for the purposes of the relevant discussion, is this the type of vulgarity you're referring to as a revolution?

I personally think it is the type of talk or lyrics you listen to with close friends if it came along uncontrolled, and even then, anybody with a little drop of Le7ya will feel uncomfortable. I just don't buy that vulgarity, however politically-intented, should be empowered and tolerated. Plus, I don't see any political message in the post below :) all I see is sexual perversion. For some, this is entertainment of the day, but what did they learn by the end of the day? For others, an activity that perverts the good values of self and society that good tradition and morality worked hard to establish.

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2:35 pm    November 28, 2007
dean
7
9am zbibi 9am
9am zbibi 9am
ah 3ibad llah
wa jibou le97ab
wach houa isber ?
wellahima isber...
ah 3ibad llah
wellahima isber
wa jibou jibou

bgha ifeyyed 7libou
ya slip te9tte3
serwal tcherreg

dihe ou jibou

7eyyedi serwalek
7eyyedi garsonek
7essni t'bbonek

a 3iba llah
wellahima isber
wellahima isber

wella key hder
wella fihe chber
3amou telt ch'her
w rajjel makayen
ma derna walou
a 3ibad llahe
wa jibou l97ab
wa baghi ne7wi

wellahima isber

wayeh wayeh wayeh waaaayeh !

·

12:33 pm    November 26, 2007

abdelilah message
6
I think that the trend has always started to be reversed Baba Salem. As for the illistration offered by Adnane, it is fascinating and it is an allusion to the dress codes in our society which is getting lighter and lighter. However, vulgarity is not only about clothes, it is a movement that can hurt politically if channeled properly.
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3:10 pm    November 21, 2007

Salem message
5
When do you think the trend will be reversed ?
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2:51 pm    November 21, 2007

Adnane Ben. message
4
Hey ~ I saw today an drawing illustration sort of related to this note, and I thought it was so true, funny and Brilliant! See below and let me know what you think:
·

12:02 pm    November 19, 2007

mareline nazem message
3
lemsakh is nowadays movement don't y see't in arabic music channels like (wawa ah) (bouss lwawa) and all these sheap arabic singers dancing naked on bed with thier naked fake (palstic surgery) bodies???!!!!! like nansi 3ajram, elissa, haifa nad more.......

mareline_nazem@hotmail.com

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10:29 am    November 14, 2007

Badr message
2
Le fait que les mots vulgaires soit une repression dans la sociétée marocaine, a conduit certains chanteur a l'utiliser, ce qui est pour eux une revolution.
En introduisant des mots vulgaires dans leurs textes, il me parait que cela est du a une envie de montrer au peuple marocain qu'on peut depasser le stade d être renfermer sur des absurdités, puisque dans les rues "drouba" on utilise souvent l'étendue de ce vocabulaire vulgaire.
Mais a mon avie ce n'est pas comme cela qu'on arrivera a faire avancer les choses, certes on peut considérer que c'est une sorte de liberté puisque avant, tout ce qui toucher a la sexualité ou au "gros mots" était censuré.
Hélas, la révolution culturelle ne se fait pas de cette manière, pour que cette révolution se fasse je pense que le gouvernement marocain doit essayer de donner plus d'importance au domaine culturel, et que les marocains mettent un peu de leur sien et cultive leur côté culturel.
·

4:29 pm    November 12, 2007

Adnane Ben. message
1
A movement or revolution are usually a reflection of positive change. Vulgarity in music is not a reflection of positive change. Or is it? probably that's what you're trying to answer. This is an issue in America. Morocco is merely catching up with it as the rappers there follow on the footsteps of American rappers. I personally have nothing against subtle lyrics that try to convey an image of romance or sexuality as long as it is not explicit. This is not something new. It has existed since man learned how to speak. From ancient poets like Emru'u Lqayss, to North African shyoukh and sheikhat. These artists struggle between free speech and vulgarity, and choose to successfully use the language in creative and subtle ways. They produce some beautiful things. You'd notice that not everyone will realize the sexist imagery behind the talk. The ones who do are mature enough to appreciate it or reject it. These artists were true enough to set an example for anyone who happens at some point to grabble with this. If some singers in Morocco are choosing to be explicit about sexuality through vulgarity, then they are, in my humble opinion, simply not creative or considerate enough. They are the careless kind. How can the careless kind be associated with movements, let alone revolutions!
·

abdelilah's notes (2)
 
2007
Vulgarity as revolution: Lemsakh we tsalguit..
marrying lkofra..


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